KIM HAXTON Special Guest JAN. 13

Special Guest Kim Haxton January 13 at 11 am:

Humanity is in an unprecedented era. Collectively we sit on the verge of creation and destruction. Challenges to planetary well-being have never been more evident and creating opportunities for positive, actionable change have never been more vital. Cultures around the world use songs, ceremonies, storytelling, connecting with nature. Though techniques vary, all ceremonies allow people to enter the sacred, heal from past traumas, and honor one another and all of creation in reverence. Through a series of exercises that are focused on self knowing we will explore what that looks like through an indigenous lens of connection, generosity and healing.

Afternoon Workshop from 1:15 – 3:15 pm:

Most people have lost their way. Once intimately connected to the vital factors and processes of the Earth, we have become domesticated, removed and separate from our wild past. Rewilding is the process of decolonizing our minds, un-domesticating our bodies and returning to our wild, authentic selves.

The workshop will explore tools creating right relationships with ourselves, each other and the natural world. Kim will be exploring a world view thru an Indigenous lens. There are prophecies that cross over from different Indigenous cultures that refer to seven generations. One story is that we need to understand that we have three generations behind us and three to come after us. Standing in the center, the responsibility is on the current generation, and the time to act wisely is now. There is a strong resurgence of cultural identity through decolonization, Nation-building, food sovereignty movements, land defenders and artists who have taken up different forms of resistance. The power and conviction of Indigenous voices are rising. Voices of the current generation are heeding the wisdom of the previous generations, urging us to consider the consequence for the next three generations.

While there are different rituals, rites and ceremonies, all cultures around the world have their healers, medicine people and plant medicines.  People may use songs, ceremonies, storytelling, connecting with nature. Though cultures and techniques vary, all ceremonies allow people to enter the sacred, heal from past traumas, and honor one another and all of creation in reverence.

Kim Haxton  (B.A., HBOR, Embodied Awareness Faculty, Certified Embodied Awareness Facilitator; Trainer, Educator and Expert Intuitive) is a multifaceted, multidimensional educator, rooted in knowledge and steeped in community. She is Potowotomi from the community of Wasauksing. She has worked across Turtle Island and internationally in various capacities, always emphasizing local leadership development toward genuine healing. In her work with Indigeneyez, a creative arts- based organization she co-founded, Kim works with Indigenous communities toward decolonization and lateral liberation. Grounded in the arts and the natural world for embodied awareness and facilitated rites of passage, Kim develops leadership courses that teach de-escalation skills, trauma recovery, diversity and anti-oppression education. She has also been working with traditional plant medicines. Kim has developed and facilitated programs, and has been working in land-based education and leadership in corporate and non- profit agencies for the past 25 years.

 

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